Tooth Erosion

Enamel is the hardest tissue in the human body. Tooth erosion is when the enamel wears away exposing the dentin. There are several things that could cause this.

What you eat is a big part of it. Foods or drinks with a lower PH level have a higher level of acidity. Studies show that enamel can be damaged after just 30 seconds of high acidity contact. Some of the most common and most acidic foods we consume include soda, fruit juices, pickles, citrus fruits, wine, yogurt or even honey. The acids in some fruit drinks can be more erosive than battery acid. Saliva is meant to help neutralize acidic food and residue on your teeth but sometimes there’s not enough time between acidic snacks or drinks for your enamel to remineralize before you eat more and give them another dose of the acid to soak in. Another cause could be clenching or grinding your teeth. This is commonly done at night while you’re sleeping.

Discoloration is a common sign of tooth erosion. Erosion is when it takes the enamel off and exposes the dentin layer of the tooth. The more exposed dentin there is, the yellower the tooth can be. You may also experience sensitivity, transparent looking teeth, cracks, or cupping (little dents in the teeth).

There are a couple ways you can prevent tooth erosion. Try drinking any soda or low PH

drinks through a straw. This prevents them from swishing around your mouth and getting to all of your teeth. You may also want to try to only eat acidic foods at meal times as opposed to all throughout the day, leaving time for your enamel to remineralize. After eating, rinse your mouth out with water, fluoridated is best, and then brush your teeth an hour later. You want to avoid brushing your teeth right away because the enamel is already soft and brushing your teeth could just add more trauma and erosion. You could also consider chewing sugar free gum after eating as it helps produce the necessary saliva to neutralize acid.